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Plainfield
Not yet SmartPower 20% by 2010 Community
Clean Energy Customers to Date:
Customers: 14
% of Households: 0.23%
Joined the 20% by 2010 Campaign:
Plainfield has not yet committed to the SmartPower 20% by 2010 Clean Energy Campaign. When Plainfield commits to 20% clean energy use by 2010 and also achieves 100 signups of the CTCleanEnergyOptions program, Plainfield will then be eligible to receive a FREE solar panel from the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund. If you are interested in having your town join the SmartPower 20% by 2010 Campaign call us now!
SmartPower Contact Information:
Bob Wall, New England Regional Director bwall@smartpower.org
Keri Enright, Program Coordinator kenright@smartpower.org
Phone: 860-249-7040
Town Hall Address & Website:
8 Community Avenue
Plainfield CT 06374
http://www.plainfieldct.org/
Local Clean Energy Supporters:
Quality Homemakers, Inc.- CTCleanEnergyOptions - Community Energy
Town Description:

The history of Plainfield officially began with its incorporation by an act of the General Court of Connecticut in May 1699. In the year it was accepted by the legislature as a township and in the five decades preceding it, the area where Plainfield is located was known to European settlers as the Quinebaug country, an English transcription of the Indian name for the tribe or band of Native Americans inhabiting the area, and for the river which flows through eastern Connecticut before joining the Shetucket river at Norwich.

Migrants to the lands along the Quinebaug River, whether Native American or European, were attracted by the same physical features and natural resources – fertile land consisting of meadows and upland, and abundant water from the area’s springs, streams and rivers. The very name Plainfield, bestowed by Governor Fitz-John Winthrop in 1700, testifies to the importance placed on those fertile open fields along the Quinebaug which yielded heavy crops of Indian corn to the Quinebaug Indians as well as abundant harvests of wheat and rye to European farmers who first came to work the land in the late 1680s and 1690s.

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© 2006 Connecticut Clean Energy Fund